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Heidi Winzinger: Books & Documentaries

Mount Holly Photo History

see my "Products"page to buy this book form Arcadia publishing!

Mount Holly's history predates the American Revolution by nearly one hundred years. Walter Reeves, who lived on the Rancocas Creek before 1677, purchased land in what would become Mount Holly from Native Americans or assumed ownership through squatter's rights. The community is home to the oldest operating fire company in the United States, the Prison Museum designed by Robert Mills, and the oldest schoolhouse in New Jersey, still on its original site. Occasionally throughout its history, Mount Holly has fallen victim to the Rancocas Creek, which has swelled over its banks and spilled into the streets. Many bridges were built, allowing residents to pass over the creek and offering Mount Holly its first name, Bridgetown. As early as 1723, entrepreneurs took advantage of the water by digging the millrace, which powered the great mills that became the impetus for development and commerce in Mount Holly. The mills are gone now, but the town that developed around them still has all the character of an early working town. Mount Holly takes a glance at the early commerce, architecture, unfortunate disasters, and celebrations that molded this town into the diverse community that it is today.

some of my documentary work

Many years ago I became interested in documenting the lives of friends and events in and around my life. I started out recording oral history and initiating a historic photo preservation project here in my hometown of Mount Holly New Jersey.  Together with an old friend Mary Smith, we published a book of historical photos and descriptions for Mount Holly.  I'm working on editing those old recordings which will end up in a video someday.

In the meantime, I learned a little bit of video production through the wonderful adult classes at WHYY in Philadelphia.  Now I can make some basic music videos and record and edit some basic small small documentaries. More to come.

An interview with artist Bette Johnson at her family farm in Medford New Jersey. She was sure she would become a city girl, but her future husband showed her another path, with a far different landscape. This is a peak into Bette's rich life as the "artistic" pillar of the Johnson family and the Johnson Corner Farm.

 

JoAnn Winzinger (my mother) has been a demolition contractor for most of her life. She saves artifacts and salvaged materials and finds new uses for them. Many of these artifacts and materials can be found in buildings she has renovated in the Mill Race Village Shops and The Robin's Nest Restaurant in Mount Holly New Jersey.

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